Karls Family Dentistry

Posts for: July, 2016

By Karls Family Dentistry
July 26, 2016
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: braces   orthodontics   Clear Braces  

Traditional braces are, unfortunately, not the most subtle way to correct your smile. With all of the metal wires and brackets, braces clear braceschange your look significantly during treatment. However, thanks to clear braces, you can straighten your smile discreetly and effectively. Get a smile you love without the hassle of metal braces with help from father and son team Dr. Matthew Karls and Dr. Stanley Karls at Karls Family Dentistry in Waunakee, WI.

What are clear braces? 
Clear braces like Invisalign use clear aligner trays worn in succession instead of the traditional metal brackets and wires. The idea stays the same, using pressure strategically placed onto the teeth to move them into their correct positions. However, the clear aligner trays are removable, allowing the patient to eat without avoiding certain foods and clean their teeth without using special threaders or water picks. Additionally, clear braces are discreet and blend right into your smile. This means that clear braces are mostly unnoticeable to other people.

What can clear braces do for me? 
Clear braces treat the same orthodontic issues as traditional braces, which include:

  • misaligned or “crooked” teeth
  • overcrowded teeth
  • under crowded teeth
  • overbite
  • underbite
  • cross bite
  • open bite

Clear Braces in Waunakee, WI
Clear braces are suitable for teens and adults who wish to improve their smile or bite. Some orthodontic treatment begins before the age of 12 in order to guide a still-growing mouth into position while avoiding future problems. Good candidates for clear braces should have an excellent at-home oral care routine. Keeping your teeth clean and healthy avoids complications which could lengthen treatment time such as tooth decay or gum disease. Additionally, patients should commit to wearing their aligner trays for at least 22 hours a day, including while sleeping.

For more information on clear braces, please contact Dr. Matthew Karls and Dr. Stanley Karls at Karls Family Dentistry in Waunakee, WI. Call 608-849-4100 to schedule your consultation for orthodontic care today!


By Karls Family Dentistry
July 18, 2016
Category: Dental Procedures
HowKathyBatesRetainsHerMovie-StarSmile

In her decades-long career, renowned actress Kathy Bates has won Golden Globes, Emmys, and many other honors. Bates began acting in her twenties, but didn't achieve national recognition until she won the best actress Oscar for Misery — when she was 42 years old! “I was told early on that because of my physique and my look, I'd probably blossom more in my middle age,” she recently told Dear Doctor magazine. “[That] has certainly been true.” So if there's one lesson we can take from her success, it might be that persistence pays off.

When it comes to her smile, Kathy also recognizes the value of persistence. Now 67, the veteran actress had orthodontic treatment in her 50's to straighten her teeth. Yet she is still conscientious about wearing her retainer. “I wear a retainer every night,” she said. “I got lazy about it once, and then it was very difficult to put the retainer back in. So I was aware that the teeth really do move.”

Indeed they do. In fact, the ability to move teeth is what makes orthodontic treatment work. By applying consistent and gentle forces, the teeth can be shifted into better positions in the smile. That's called the active stage of orthodontic treatment. Once that stage is over, another begins: the retention stage. The purpose of retention is to keep that straightened smile looking as good as it did when the braces came off. And that's where the retainer comes in.

There are several different kinds of retainers, but all have the same purpose: To hold the teeth in their new positions and keep them from shifting back to where they were. We sometimes say teeth have a “memory” — not literally, but in the sense that if left alone, teeth tend to migrate back to their former locations. And if you've worn orthodontic appliances, like braces or aligners, that means right back where you started before treatment.

By holding the teeth in place, retainers help stabilize them in their new positions. They allow new bone and ligaments to re-form and mature around them, and give the gums time to remodel themselves. This process can take months to years to be complete. But you may not need to wear a retainer all the time: Often, removable retainers are worn 24 hours a day at first; later they are worn only at night. We will let you know what's best in your individual situation.

So take a tip from Kathy Bates, star of the hit TV series American Horror Story, and wear your retainer as instructed. That's the best way to keep your straight new smile from changing back to the way it was — and to keep a bad dream from coming true.

If you would like more information about orthodontic retainers, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more about this topic in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Why Orthodontic Retainers?” and “The Importance of Orthodontic Retainers.” The interview with Kathy Bates appears in the latest issue of Dear Doctor.


By Karls Family Dentistry
July 10, 2016
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: tooth replacement  
TeensBenefitMostfromATemporarySolutiontoMissingTeeth

While tooth loss can occur at any age, replacing one in a younger patient requires a different approach than for someone older. It’s actually better to hold off on a permanent restoration like a dental implant if the person is still in their teens.

This is because a teenager’s jaws won’t finish developing until after nineteen or in their early twenties. An implant set in the jawbone before then could end up out of alignment, making it appear out of place — and it also may not function properly. A temporary replacement improves form and function for now and leaves the door open for a permanent solution later.

The two most common choices for teens are a removable partial denture (RPD) or a bonded fixed bridge. RPDs consist of a plastic gum-colored base with an attached prosthetic (false) tooth matching the missing tooth’s type, shape and jaw position. Most dentists recommend an acrylic base for teens for its durability (although they should still be careful biting into something hard).

The fixed bridge option is not similar to one used commonly with adult teeth, as the adult version requires permanent alteration of the teeth on either side of the missing tooth to support the bridge. The version for teens, known as a “bonded” or “Maryland bridge,” uses tiny tabs of dental material bonded to the back of the false tooth with the extended portion then bonded to the back of the adjacent supporting teeth.

While bonded bridges don’t permanently alter healthy teeth, they also can’t withstand the same level of biting forces as a traditional bridge used for adults. The big drawback is if the bonding breaks free a new bonded bridge will likely be necessary with additional cost for the replacement.

The bridge option generally costs more than an RPD, but buys the most time and is most comfortable before installing a permanent restoration. Depending on your teen’s age and your financial ability, you may find it the most ideal — though not every teen is a good candidate. That will depend on how their bite, teeth-grinding habits or the health of surrounding gums might impact the bridge’s stability and durability.

A complete dental exam, then, is the first step toward determining which options are feasible. From there we can discuss the best choice that matches your teen’s long-term health, as well as your finances.

If you would like more information on tooth replacement solutions for younger patients, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.